Virginia Citizens Defense League, Inc., P.O. Box 513, Newington, VA 22122
804-639-0600 • 703-372-3285 • 757-271-3705 • 540-446-5783

VCDL 20192 Special Session Legislation Tracking Tool

Bills We Strongly Support

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
Bills We Support

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
HB4014       Patron: David E. Yancey  -  all patrons                                          
Sentence reductions; substantial assistance to prosecution. Allows a convicted person's sentence to be reduced by the sentencing court if the court determines such person provided substantial assistance in the furtherance of the investigation or prosecution of another person engaged in an act of grand larceny of a firearm, criminal street gang participation, or recruitment of persons for criminal street gangs. Consideration of sentence reduction can occur only upon motion of the attorney for the Commonwealth.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows a person convicted of an act of larceny of a firearm or certain gang activity to get a reduced sentence if that person provides useful assistance in the investigation or prosecution of another involved person.
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200155D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  House: Referred by voice vote with letter to Crime Commission
 
 
Bills We Strongly Oppose

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
HJ4001       Patron: Kaye Kory  -  all patrons                                          
Gun Violence Awareness Day. Designates June 1, in 2020 and in each succeeding year, as Gun Violence Awareness Day in Virginia.



VCDL Comments
This is a joint resolution designating June 1 of each year as "Gun Violence Awareness Day." As with other gun-control bills, the purpose is to demonize guns by focusing on a tool, while not addressing the actual underlying problem at all. For example, just as many people commit suicide without a gun as with a gun. In Japan, suicides are virtually never committed with a fiream, yet Japan's suicide rate is over twice as high as the U.S. rate. The number of homicides using a firearm includes justifyable and excusable homicides, with the vast majority of the rest of the homicides being criminal on criminal. It would make far more sense to at least call the event, "Violence Awareness Day," so as to focus on reducing all kinds of violence regardless of the tool used.
07/05/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200052D
07/05/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety




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Bills We Oppose

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
 
Bills We Are Currently Neutral On

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
HB4016       Patron: Charles D. Poindexter  -  all patrons                                          

Use or display of firearm in committing felony; penalty. Increases from three to five years for a first offense and from five to 10 years for a second or subsequent offense the mandatory minimum sentences for use or display of a firearm during the commission of certain felonies.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates new mandatory-minimum penalties on people committing certain felonies using firearms. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200174D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  House: Referred by voice vote with letter to Crime Commission
HB4018       Patron: Jason S. Miyares  -  all patrons                                          

Use or display of firearm in committing felony; firearm silencer; penalty. Provides that an additional two-year mandatory minimum term of imprisonment shall be imposed for use or display of a firearm in the commission of a felony if the firearm is equipped with a firearm silencer, as defined in the bill, at the time of the offense. The bill retains the current penalties for use or display of a firearm in the commission of a felony of a three-year mandatory minimum term of imprisonment for a first offense and a five-year mandatory minimum term of imprisonment for a second offense.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates a mandatory-minimum penalty for a person using a silencer (suppressor) during the commission of a felony. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200175D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  House: Referred by voice vote with letter to Crime Commission
 
Bills That Have Been Rolled Into Other Bills, Continued to Next Year, Withdrawn or Killed

 
Bill Summary Bill Status
HB4001       Patron: Mark L. Cole  -  all patrons

Right to keep and bear arms. Codifies the opinion of the Supreme Court of the United States in District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008), that the right to keep and bear arms conferred by the United States Constitution and the Constitution of Virginia is an individual right.



VCDL Comments
This bill clarifies that the right to keep and bear arms in Virginia is an individual right that is not connected with military service and that it is the intent of the General Assembly to codify the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on District of Columbia v Heller.
07/02/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200101D
07/02/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
HB4002       Patron: Mark L. Cole  -  all patrons

Carrying concealed handgun with a permit; employees of any agency of the Commonwealth or political subdivision thereof. Provides that, notwithstanding any other provision of law or any rule, regulation, or workplace policy to the contrary, an employee of any agency of the Commonwealth or a political subdivision thereof with a valid concealed handgun permit may possess or carry a concealed handgun at his workplace. The bill also provides that any agency of the Commonwealth or a political subdivision thereof may prohibit employees from possessing or carrying a concealed handgun at the workplace only if such agency or political subdivision has employed law-enforcement officers or armed security officers to provide protection at such workplace.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires that state and local government allow employees with concealed handgun permits to carry concealed in their workplace, unless there are armed security at that workplace.
07/03/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200069D
07/03/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
SB4016       Patron: Richard H. Black  -  all patrons

Regulation of firearms by localities; workplace rules; limitation. Prohibits a locality from adopting or enforcing any workplace rule that prevents or restricts an employee of the locality from possessing or carrying a concealed handgun at the locality's workplace if the employee possesses a valid concealed handgun permit.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows local government employees with concealed handgun permits to carry or possess a firearm at the workplace.
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200213D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4015       Patron: Thomas K. Norment, Jr.  -  all patrons

Public schools; firearm safety education program. Requires local school boards to provide firearm safety education programs for students in all grades. The bill requires the Board of Education to establish curriculum guidelines for the program, in consultation with the Department of State Police, requires school boards to offer a minimum of two hours of instruction consistent with such guidelines, and requires that the program be taught by a school resource officer, other law-enforcement officer, or a United States Armed Services instructor. The bill prohibits the use of firearms in the program. Current law allows local school boards to provide a firearm safety education program for students in the elementary grades and does not specify who may instruct such program.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires schools to teach firearm safety education at all grades. The curriculum will be developed by the Board of Education in consultation with the Virginia State Police. The courses will be taught by a law-enforcement officer, not using actual firearms.
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200181D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee on Education and Health
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Education and Health with letter (10-Y 1-N 1-A)
HB4003       Patron: Richard C. "Rip" Sullivan, Jr.  -  all patrons


Firearms; removal from persons posing substantial risk; penalties. Creates a procedure by which any attorney for the Commonwealth or any law-enforcement officer may apply to a general district court, circuit court, or juvenile and domestic relations district court judge or magistrate for an emergency substantial risk order to prohibit a person who poses a substantial risk of injury to himself or others from purchasing, possessing, or transporting a firearm. If an emergency substantial risk order is issued, a judge or magistrate may issue a search warrant to remove firearms from such person. An emergency substantial risk order shall expire on the fourteenth day following issuance of the order. The bill requires a court hearing in the circuit court for the jurisdiction where the order was issued within 14 days from issuance of an emergency substantial risk order to determine whether a substantial risk order should be issued. Seized firearms shall be retained by a law-enforcement agency for the duration of an emergency substantial risk order or a substantial risk order or, for a substantial risk order and with court approval, may be transferred to a third party 21 years of age or older chosen by the person from whom they were seized. The bill allows the complainant of the original warrant to file a motion for a hearing to extend the substantial risk order prior to its expiration. The court may extend the order for a period not longer than 180 days. The bill provides that persons who are subject to a substantial risk order, until such order has been dissolved by a court, are guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor for purchasing, possessing, or transporting a firearm; are disqualified from having a concealed handgun permit; and may not be employed by a licensed firearms dealer. The bill also provides that a person who transfers a firearm to a person he knows has been served with a warrant or who is the subject of an order is guilty of a Class 4 felony. The bill creates a computerized substantial risk order registry for the entry of orders issued pursuant to provisions in the bill. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates an Emergency Substantial Risk Order (ESRO) and a Substantial Risk Order (SRO), AKA "Red Flag" laws. The ESRO, which allows the police to confiscate the firearms from the subject of the ESRO, is issued ex-parte, so the subject will have no idea what has transpired and no way to legally defend himself against an ESRO issued upon false or misleading facts. While the subject's firearms are taken, the "dangerous" subject is left walking around with the rest of us, still perfectly able to harm himself or others. The ESRO strips the subject of a constitutionally-protected civil right for up to 14 days without the subject being allowed due process to defend himself. The subject of the ESRO has committed no crime, yet is presumed to be dangerous until the subject can prove he is not, just the opposite of the presumption of innocence and the other due-process protections in the Constitution. SROs, which can be as long as six months, can be extended endlessly based merely on the word of an accuser, without the subject having been convicted of anything. The accused can appeal the SRO once during the six-month period, but only after a minimum of 30 days has elapsed. The police are given a blank check to be careless, as they are not responsible for damages or even the loss of the subject's firearms! ESROs and SROs are about confiscation, not public safety, and have been frequently used by disgruntled persons to get legal "revenge" against another based merely upon conjecture that the subject might do something in the future. It is a mere misdemeanor charge for the person requesting the ESRO and SRO to do so under false pretenses. This bill is based around how Emergency Protective Orders are handled, but it does not offer the same due process protections before a person's guns are confiscated. Any person with designs could use this to preemptively disarm his or her intended victim.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/06/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200145D
07/06/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
HB4004       Patron: Jeion A. Ward  -  all patrons

Purchase of handguns; limitation on handgun purchases; penalty. Prohibits any person who is not a licensed firearms dealer from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-day period and makes such an offense a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts from this provision (i) persons who have been issued a certificate by the Department of State Police under certain circumstances and with an enhanced background check, (ii) law-enforcement agencies and officers, (iii) state and local correctional facilities, (iv) licensed private security companies, (v) persons whose handgun has been stolen or irretrievably lost or who are trading in a handgun, and (vi) purchases of antique firearms. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill reinstates the old "One Handgun a Month" law, however with no exception for concealed handgun permit holders. There was no evidence to show that the old One Handgun a Month law did anything to reduce crime or gun trafficking. South Carolina repealed their One Handgun a Month law and a federal appeals court struck down that law in the District of Columbia.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/06/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200147D
07/06/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
HB4005       Patron: Marcia S. "Cia" Price  -  all patrons

Control of firearms by localities. Grants localities authority to adopt or enforce an ordinance, resolution, or motion, governing the possession, carrying, storage, or transporting of firearms, ammunition, or components or combination thereof in the locality. Various provisions limiting such authority are repealed. Provisions limiting the authority of localities and state governmental entities to bring lawsuits against certain firearms manufacturers and others are also repealed.



VCDL Comments
This bill guts Virginia's firearms preemption law. It not only allows localities to create a confusing patchwork of areas where possession and carrying of a firearm, ammunition, and components are prohibited, it also removes the restrictions on localities controlling the storage and transporting of those items. This bill takes us back to the days when local gun-laws were so confusing that no one knew what all of them were, not even the police. Current law allows only the General Assembly, with its 140 members, vs 5 to 9 members for any local government, to make a case-by-case decision on anything affecting firearms. Preemption provides for a set of uniform gun laws across the Commonwealth, that are easy for gun owners to understand and obey. HB 4005 will discourage lawful carrying, possessing, storing, and transporting of firearms due to how complicated firearm ownership will become. Finally, HB 4005 removes the requirement that localities that buy up firearms from the public by providing a thing of value, must attempt to auction the firearms to gun dealers. Since firearms can be valuable, current law puts money into local government coffers that would not be available if the firearms are destroyed, as allowed by HB 4005. The firearms will only be sold by the dealer winning the bid to individuals who have passed a background check, and therefore are not placed "on the street."

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/07/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200141D
07/07/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
HB4008       Patron: Glenn R. Davis  -  all patrons

Concealed handgun permits; demonstration of competence. Removes the option for concealed handgun permit applicants to demonstrate competence with a handgun by completing an electronic, video, or online course conducted by a state-certified or National Rifle Association-certified firearms instructor. The bill does not affect any in-person means of satisfying the requirement to demonstrate competence with a handgun under current law.



VCDL Comments
This bill removes the online training option to get a concealed handgun permit. A solution in search of a problem. Concealed handgun permit holders who have had online training have not been having safety issues when carrying their handguns. Importantly, online training allows someone who has an urgent need to get a concealed handgun permit (such as a person in immediate danger from an ex-spouse) the fastest way to do so.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200108D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
HB4009       Patron: David J. Toscano  -  all patrons

Protective orders; possession of firearms; surrender or transfer of firearms; penalty. Prohibits any person subject to a permanent protective order (i.e., a protective order with a maximum duration of two years) from knowingly possessing a firearm while the order is in effect, provided that for a period of 24 hours after being served with a protective order such person may continue to possess such firearm for the purposes of selling or transferring it to any person who is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing such firearm. A violation of this provision is a Class 6 felony. The bill provides that within 48 hours after selling or transferring all firearms, such person must certify in writing that all firearms possessed by such person have either been sold or transferred and file such certification with the clerk of the court that entered the protective order. The bill also provides that any person subject to a protective order who fails to certify in writing that all firearms possessed by such person have either been sold or transferred is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill takes away a person's right to possess a firearm if they are subject to a permanent protective order that does not deal with family abuse. There are two sides to every story and a protective order which prohibits possession of firearms altogether can be gotten in bad faith and used as a weapon to disarm someone with the intent of attacking them once they are disarmed. Also, this kind of protective order is handed out like candy during divorces and a restriction on merely possessing a firearm at home is overreach.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200149D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
SB4008       Patron: John S. Edwards  -  all patrons


Control of firearms by localities. Grants localities authority to adopt or enforce an ordinance, resolution, or motion, governing the possession, carrying, storage, or transporting of firearms, ammunition, or components or combination thereof in the locality. Various provisions limiting such authority are repealed. Provisions limiting the authority of localities and state governmental entities to bring lawsuits against certain firearms manufacturers and others are also repealed.



VCDL Comments
This bill guts Virginia's firearms preemption law. It not only allows localities to create a confusing patchwork of areas where possession and carrying of a firearm, ammunition, and components are prohibited, it also removes the restrictions on localities controlling the storage and transporting of those items.  This bill takes us back to the days when local gun-laws were so confusing that no one knew what all of them were, not even the police. Current law allows only the General Assembly, with its 140 members, vs 5 to 9 members for any local government, to make a case-by-case decision on anything affecting firearms. Preemption provides for a set of uniform gun laws across the Commonwealth, that are easy for gun owners to understand and obey. SB 4008 will discourage lawful carrying, possessing, storing, and transporting of firearms due to how complicated firearm ownership will become. Finally, SB 4008 removes the requirement that localities that buy up firearms from the public by providing a thing of value, must attempt to auction the firearms to gun dealers.  Since firearms can be valuable, current law puts money into local government coffers that would not be available if the firearms are destroyed, as allowed by SB 4008. The firearms will only be sold by the dealer winning the bid to individuals who have passed a background check, and therefore are not placed "on the street."

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200140D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
HB4011       Patron: Jeffrey M. Bourne  -  all patrons

Reporting lost or stolen firearms; civil penalty. Requires that, if a firearm is lost or stolen from a person who lawfully possessed it, such person shall report the loss or theft of the firearm to any local law-enforcement agency or the Department of State Police within 24 hours after such person discovers the loss or theft or is informed by a person with personal knowledge of the loss or theft. The bill requires the relevant law-enforcement agency to enter the report information into the National Crime Information Center. A violation is punishable by a civil penalty of not more than $250. The bill provides that a person who, in good faith, reports the loss or theft is immune from criminal or civil liability for acts or omissions that result from the loss or theft. The immunity does not apply to a person who knowingly gives a false report. The bill does not apply to the loss or theft of an antique firearm.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires that a person report a lost or stolen firearm within 24 hours of discovering the firearm is lost or stolen. The penalty for reporting late is $250. A person in good faith who reports such a lost or stolen firearm is immune from any criminal or civil damage from acts using the firearm. The victim gets punished twice: once by the theft or loss and next by the government for not reporting the loss quickly enough. Who's to say exactly when the victim "discovered" the loss or theft? The bill also is setting a precedent that the victim is somehow liable for the misuse of a stolen firearm if he doesn't report it stolen quickly enough.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200139D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
HB4015       Patron: Kenneth R. Plum  -  all patrons


Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks; penalty. Requires a background check for any firearm transfer and directs the Department of State Police (the Department) to establish a process for transferors to obtain such a check from licensed firearms dealers. A transferor who sells a firearm to another person without obtaining the required background check is guilty of a Class 6 felony. The bill also provides that a transferee who receives a firearm from another person without obtaining the required background check is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts transfers (i) between immediate family members; (ii) that occur by operation of law; (iii) by the executor or administrator of an estate or by the trustee of a testamentary trust; (iv) at firearms shows in accordance with law; (v) that are part of a buy-back or give-back program; (vi) of antique firearms; (vii) that occur at a shooting range, shooting gallery, or any other area designed for the purpose of target shooting, for use during target practice, a firearms safety or training course or class, a shooting competition, or any similar lawful activity; or (viii) that are temporary transfers that (a) occur within the continuous presence of the owner of the firearm or (b) are necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm. The bill removes the provision that makes background checks of prospective purchasers or transferees at firearms shows voluntary. The bill also provides that the Department shall have three business days to complete a criminal history record information check before a firearm may be transferred. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires that all private sales of firearms go through a federal firearms licensed dealer ("Universal Background Check"). This bill will do nothing about crime, but will make it harder and more expensive for a citizen to sell or trade one of his firearms to another citizen. No dealer is required to make such a transfer, possibly making a private transfer all but impossible or not possible in a timely manner. The dealer may charge a fee of up to $15, raising the price of the firearm. Finally, this bill will also lead to an inevitable "Universal Registration" scheme at some point in the future to provide for enforcement. Firearms confiscation is the end goal, as is happening right now in California and Hawaii with their universal background checks and associated gun registrations. Illinois has universal background checks, but a 2015 survey of criminals in Illinois prisons showed that only 3% got their firearms after going through a background check! The rest got their guns using straw purchases, theft, from friends, from family, and the black market. Finally, this bill strips a person from 18 to 20 years-old from being able to legally purchase a handgun. Under current law it is legal for someone in that age range to purchase a handgun from a private seller.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200151D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
SB4001       Patron: John S. Edwards  -  all patrons

Control of firearms; chambers of local governing bodies. Allows a locality to adopt an ordinance that prohibits firearms, ammunition, or components or a combination thereof at any regular or special meeting of its local governing body, provided that notice of such prohibition is publicly posted and the meeting room is owned or operated by the locality.



VCDL Comments
This bill guts Virginia's firearms preemption law, restoring Virginia to the bad old days prior to 1987, when there was a mishmash of local gun laws that made it virtually impossible for gun owners to know and obey. Richmond had an ordinance, for example, that prohibited taxi cab drivers from having a gun to protect themselves, even if they had a CHP. Some localities banned open carry, some banned guns in parks, some required a special permit to purchase a handgun. SB 4001 also allows localities to prohibit guns at local government meetings, making those meetings dangerous "gun-free zones," where a violent attacker with a gun would have complete control of a room of defenseless people.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/05/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200061D
07/05/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4002       Patron: Mamie E. Locke  -  all patrons

Purchase of handguns; limitation on handgun purchases; penalty. Prohibits any person who is not a licensed firearms dealer from purchasing more than one handgun in a 30-day period and makes such an offense a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts from this provision (i) persons who have been issued a certificate by the Department of State Police under certain circumstances and with an enhanced background check, (ii) law-enforcement agencies and officers, (iii) state and local correctional facilities, (iv) licensed private security companies, (v) persons whose handgun has been stolen or irretrievably lost or who are trading in a handgun, and (vi) purchases of antique firearms. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill reinstates the old "One Handgun a Month" law, however with no exception for concealed handgun permit holders. There was no evidence to show that the old One Handgun a Month law did anything to reduce crime or gun trafficking. South Carolina repealed their One Handgun a Month law and a federal appeals court struck down that law in the District of Columbia.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/06/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200146D
07/06/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4020       Patron: Thomas K. Norment, Jr.  -  all patrons

Concealed handgun permit; disqualifications; assault, assault and battery, sexual battery, discharging of a firearm, or brandishing of a firearm. Provides that a person is disqualified from obtaining a concealed handgun permit if he has been convicted of an assault or assault and battery within the five-year period immediately preceding the application or if he has been convicted of sexual battery, discharging of a firearm, or brandishing of a firearm within the 10-year period immediately preceding the application. Currently, such disqualification applies if an individual was convicted of any of those offenses within the three-year period immediately preceding the application.



VCDL Comments
This bill sets the waiting time to qualify for a concealed handgun permit for someone convicted of an assault or assault and battery to five years. It also increases the waiting time from three years to ten years for someone convicted of sexual battery, discharging a firearm in a public place or from a vehicle, or brandishing. Ten years is an unreasonable length of time to wait and is a solution looking for a problem.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200114D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4019       Patron: L. Louise Lucas  -  all patrons


Firearm transfers; criminal history record information checks; penalty. Requires a background check for any firearm transfer and directs the Department of State Police (the Department) to establish a process for transferors to obtain such a check from licensed firearms dealers. A transferor who sells a firearm to another person without obtaining the required background check is guilty of a Class 6 felony. The bill also provides that a transferee who receives a firearm from another person without obtaining the required background check is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill exempts transfers (i) between immediate family members; (ii) that occur by operation of law; (iii) by the executor or administrator of an estate or by the trustee of a testamentary trust; (iv) at firearms shows in accordance with law; (v) that are part of a buy-back or give-back program; (vi) of antique firearms; (vii) that occur at a shooting range, shooting gallery, or any other area designed for the purpose of target shooting, for use during target practice, a firearms safety or training course or class, a shooting competition, or any similar lawful activity; or (viii) that are temporary transfers that (a) occur within the continuous presence of the owner of the firearm or (b) are necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm. The bill removes the provision that makes background checks of prospective purchasers or transferees at firearms shows voluntary. The bill also provides that the Department shall have three business days to complete a criminal history record information check before a firearm may be transferred. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires that all private sales of firearms go through a federal firearms licensed dealer ("Universal Background Check"). This bill will do nothing about crime, but will make it harder and more expensive for a citizen to sell or trade one of his firearms to another citizen. No dealer is required to make such a transfer, possibly making a private transfer all but impossible or not possible in a timely manner. The dealer may charge a fee of up to $15, raising the price of the firearm. Finally, this bill will also lead to an inevitable "Universal Registration" scheme at some point in the future to provide for enforcement. Firearms confiscation is the end goal, as is happening right now in California and Hawaii with their universal background checks and associated gun registrations. Illinois has universal background checks, but a 2015 survey of criminals in Illinois prisons showed that only 3% got their firearms after going through a background check! The rest got their guns using straw purchases, theft, from friends, from family, and the black market. Finally, this bill strips a person from 18 to 20 years-old from being able to legally purchase a handgun. Under current law it is legal for someone in that age range to purchase a handgun from a private seller.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200150D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4018       Patron: Janet D. Howell  -  all patrons

Protective orders; possession of firearms; surrender or transfer of firearms; penalty. Prohibits any person subject to a permanent protective order (i.e., a protective order with a maximum duration of two years) from knowingly possessing a firearm while the order is in effect, provided that for a period of 24 hours after being served with a protective order such person may continue to possess such firearm for the purposes of selling or transferring it to any person who is not otherwise prohibited by law from possessing such firearm. A violation of this provision is a Class 6 felony. The bill provides that within 48 hours after selling or transferring all firearms, such person must certify in writing that all firearms possessed by such person have either been sold or transferred and file such certification with the clerk of the court that entered the protective order. The bill also provides that any person subject to a protective order who fails to certify in writing that all firearms possessed by such person have either been sold or transferred is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill takes away a person's right to possess a firearm if they are subject to a permanent protective order that does not deal with family abuse.  There are two sides to every story and a protective order which prohibits possession of firearms altogether can be gotten in bad faith and used as a weapon to disarm someone with the intent of attacking them once they are disarmed.  Also, this kind of protective order is handed out like candy during divorces and a restriction on merely possessing a firearm at home is overreach.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200148D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4017       Patron: Janet D. Howell  -  all patrons

Allowing access to firearms by minors; penalty. Provides that any person who recklessly leaves a loaded, unsecured firearm in such a manner as to endanger the life or limb of any person under the age of 18 is guilty of a Class 6 felony. Current law provides that any person who recklessly leaves a loaded, unsecured firearm in such a manner as to endanger the life or limb of any child under the age of 14 is guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill increases the penalty from a misdemeanor to a felony for someone who recklessly leaves a loaded, unsecured firearm in such a manner as to endanger life or limb of someone under the age of 18, which this bill increased from under the age of 14.  A person under 18-years-old can be both very mature and have had training with firearms, where leaving the loaded firearm out is not dangerous or negligent. In fact there have been plenty of cases where a person under 18-years-old has used a firearm to stop a violent home-invasion. What this bill would actually do is impose a de-facto mandatory storage requirement for gun owners who have children in the home or who have houseguests with children under 18.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200142D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
HB4006       Patron: C.E. Cliff Hayes, Jr.  -  all patrons

Allowing access to firearms by minors; penalty. Provides that any person who recklessly leaves a loaded, unsecured firearm in such a manner as to endanger the life or limb of any person under the age of 18 is guilty of a Class 6 felony. Current law provides that any person who recklessly leaves a loaded, unsecured firearm in such a manner as to endanger the life or limb of any child under the age of 14 is guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill increases the penalty from a misdemeanor to a felony for someone who recklessly leaves a loaded, unsecured firearm in such a manner as to endanger life or limb of someone under the age of 18, which this bill increased from under the age of 14. A person under 18-years-old can be both very mature and have had training with firearms, where leaving the loaded firearm out is not dangerous or negligent. In fact there have been plenty of cases where a person under 18-years-old has used a firearm to stop a violent home-invasion. What this bill would actually do is impose a de-facto mandatory storage requirement for gun owners who have children in the home or who have houseguests with children under 18.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200143D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
HB4007       Patron: Glenn R. Davis  -  all patrons

Control of firearms; local government buildings. Authorizes a locality to adopt an ordinance prohibiting firearms, ammunition, or components or combination thereof in any building owned or used by such locality for governmental purposes. Such ordinance must include a provision for security measures designed to reasonably prevent unauthorized access of such building by a person with a firearm, ammunition, or components or combination thereof. A locality must post notice of any such prohibition at all entrances of buildings used for governmental purposes.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows localities to ban guns in their government buildings if they have "reasonable" security requirements (such as metal detectors and/or increased security personnel) to prevent a person entering the building with guns and ammunition. This is a solution to a non-existent problem. Gun owners have been lawfully carrying in government buildings for many years in Virginia without incident. HB 4007 infringes on the rights of gun owners to protect themselves, not only in the building itself, but going to and from their vehicle in the parking lot.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200106D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
SB4013       Patron: Thomas K. Norment, Jr.  -  all patrons

Local government buildings; dangerous weapons; penalty. Prohibits the possession or transport of (i) guns or other weapons designed or intended to propel a missile or projectile of any kind; (ii) frames, receivers, mufflers, silencers, missiles, projectiles, or ammunition designed for use with a dangerous weapon; or (iii) certain other dangerous weapons in any building owned or used by a locality for governmental purposes in the Commonwealth. Currently, the possession or transport of such weapons is prohibited in any courthouse and is punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor. The bill makes the penalty for possession or transport of such weapons in any courthouse or building owned or used by a locality for governmental purposes a Class 6 felony.



VCDL Comments
This bill treats all local government buildings like a courthouse, banning firearms for everyone but law enforcement, judges, magistrates, and several other specific individuals while in conduct of official business. The bill raises a violation from a misdemeanor to a felony. The felony applies even if someone inadvertently brings a weapon into the building and notifies law enforcement before going through the screening process (which has happened in courthouses, but the violation was a misdemeanor and not a life-changing felony).  This is a solution to a non-existent problem. Gun owners have been lawfully carrying in government buildings for many years in Virginia without incident. SB 4013 infringes on the rights of gun owners to protect themselves, not only in the building itself, but going to and from their vehicle in the parking lot.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200113D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Stricken at the request of Patron in Courts of Justice (12-Y 2-N)
SB4012       Patron: George L. Barker  -  all patrons


Firearms; removal from persons posing substantial risk; penalties. Creates a procedure by which any attorney for the Commonwealth or any law-enforcement officer may apply to a general district court, circuit court, or juvenile and domestic relations district court judge or magistrate for an emergency substantial risk order to prohibit a person who poses a substantial risk of injury to himself or others from purchasing, possessing, or transporting a firearm. If an emergency substantial risk order is issued, a judge or magistrate may issue a search warrant to remove firearms from such person. An emergency substantial risk order shall expire on the fourteenth day following issuance of the order. The bill requires a court hearing in the circuit court for the jurisdiction where the order was issued within 14 days from issuance of an emergency substantial risk order to determine whether a substantial risk order should be issued. Seized firearms shall be retained by a law-enforcement agency for the duration of an emergency substantial risk order or a substantial risk order or, for a substantial risk order and with court approval, may be transferred to a third party 21 years of age or older chosen by the person from whom they were seized. The bill allows the complainant of the original warrant to file a motion for a hearing to extend the substantial risk order prior to its expiration. The court may extend the order for a period not longer than 180 days. The bill provides that persons who are subject to a substantial risk order, until such order has been dissolved by a court, are guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor for purchasing, possessing, or transporting a firearm; are disqualified from having a concealed handgun permit; and may not be employed by a licensed firearms dealer. The bill also provides that a person who transfers a firearm to a person he knows has been served with a warrant or who is the subject of an order is guilty of a Class 4 felony. The bill creates a computerized substantial risk order registry for the entry of orders issued pursuant to provisions in the bill. The bill establishes an appropriation for the fiscal impact of the bill and authorizes the Director of the Department of Planning and Budget to allocate such appropriation among the agencies and programs impacted by the bill.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates an Emergency Substantial Risk Order (ESRO) and a Substantial Risk Order (SRO), AKA "Red Flag" laws. The ESRO, which allows the police to confiscate the firearms from the subject of the ESRO, is issued ex-parte, so the subject will have no idea what has transpired and no way to legally defend himself against an ESRO issued upon false or misleading facts.  While the subject's firearms are taken, the "dangerous" subject is left walking around with the rest of us, still perfectly able to harm himself or others. The ESRO strips the subject of a constitutionally-protected civil right for up to 14 days without the subject being allowed due process to defend himself. The subject of the ESRO has committed no crime, yet is presumed to be dangerous until the subject can prove he is not, just the opposite of the presumption of innocence protections in the Constitution. SROs, which can be as long as six months, can be extended endlessly based merely on the word of an accuser, without the subject having been convicted of anything. The accused can appeal the SRO once during the six-month period, but only after a minimum of 30 days has elapsed.  The police are given a blank check to be careless, as they are not responsible for damages or even the loss of the subject's firearms! ESROs and SROs are about confiscation, not public safety, and have been frequently used by disgruntled persons to get legal "revenge" against another based merely upon conjecture that the subject might do something in the future.  Any person with criminal designs could use this law to preemptively disarm his or her intended victim.  It is a mere misdemeanor charge for the person requesting the ESRO and SRO to do so under false pretenses. This bill is based around how Emergency Protective Orders are handled, but it does not offer the same due process protections before a person's guns are confiscated.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200144D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4021       Patron: Jennifer L. McClellan  -  all patrons

Reporting lost or stolen firearms; civil penalty. Requires that, if a firearm is lost or stolen from a person who lawfully possessed it, such person shall report the loss or theft of the firearm to any local law-enforcement agency or the Department of State Police within 24 hours after such person discovers the loss or theft or is informed by a person with personal knowledge of the loss or theft. The bill requires the relevant law-enforcement agency to enter the report information into the National Crime Information Center. A violation is punishable by a civil penalty of not more than $250. The bill provides that a person who, in good faith, reports the loss or theft is immune from criminal or civil liability for acts or omissions that result from the loss or theft. The immunity does not apply to a person who knowingly gives a false report. The bill does not apply to the loss or theft of an antique firearm.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires that a person report a lost or stolen firearm within 24 hours of discovering the firearm is lost or stolen. The penalty for reporting late is $250. A person in good faith who reports such a lost or stolen firearm is immune from any criminal or civil damage from acts using the firearm. The victim gets punished twice: once by the theft or loss and next by the government for not reporting the loss quickly enough. Who's to say exactly when the victim "discovered" the loss or theft? The bill also is setting a precedent that the victim is somehow liable for the misuse of a stolen firearm if he doesn't report it stolen quickly enough.

Another Legislative Victory For Virginia Gun Owners!
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200138D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4011       Patron: William M. Stanley, Jr.  -  all patrons

Authorization of volunteer school security officers by local school boards and private or religious schools. Allows local school boards and private or religious schools to authorize volunteer school security officers to perform the same duties as employed school security officers. Within 10 years prior to receiving such authorization, any such officer shall have been (i) an active law-enforcement officer in the Commonwealth or (ii) employed by a law-enforcement agency of the United States or any state or political subdivision thereof with duties substantially similar to those of a law-enforcement officer in the Commonwealth. The bill requires such officers to comply with the same training course required for employed school security officers in order to carry a firearm in the performance of their duties. The bill also requires school boards and private or religious schools to treat such officers the same as employed school security officers for the purposes of fingerprinting and criminal background checks, school safety procedures, and bullying and abusive work environment education.



VCDL Comments
This bill allows public and private schools to have "volunteer school security" officers (retired law-enforcement officers who are not paid by the school) who can be armed on school property.
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200095D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4014       Patron: Thomas K. Norment, Jr.  -  all patrons

Denial of a concealed handgun permit; entry into Virginia Criminal Information Network. Requires that the final order of the court denying a person's application for a concealed handgun permit shall be provided to the Department of State Police to enter into the Virginia Criminal Information Network (the Network). The bill provides that the Department of State Police shall enter the name and description of a person whose application for a concealed handgun permit was denied and the basis of the denial of the permit in the Network so that such basis is known to law-enforcement personnel accessing the Network for investigative purposes.



VCDL Comments
This bill requires the reason for a denial of a concealed handgun permit be entered into the VCIN database.
07/08/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200115D
07/08/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
HB4010       Patron: David E. Yancey  -  all patrons

Stolen firearms; penalties. Creates or enhances penalties for crimes related to larceny of a firearm or use of a stolen firearm during the commission of a felony. The bill provides that it is (i) a Class 3 felony with a five-year mandatory minimum sentence to commit larceny of a firearm with the intent to sell or distribute and (ii) a Class 5 felony with a two-year mandatory minimum sentence to sell or distribute, attempt to sell or distribute, or possess with the intent to sell or distribute a stolen firearm. The bill adds a one-year mandatory minimum sentence to the crime of receiving a stolen firearm, which is a Class 6 felony. Finally, the bill increases the mandatory minimum sentences for possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony, if such firearm was stolen, from three years to five years for a first offense and from five years to 10 years for a second or subsequent offense.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates new mandatory-minimum penalties on people committing certain crimes using a gun they know, or should have known, was stolen. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/08/19  House: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200075D
07/08/19  House: Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety
07/09/19  House: Tabled in Militia, Police and Public Safety with letter to Crime Commission (12-Y 9-N)
SB4007       Patron: Bill R. DeSteph, Jr.  -  all patrons

Use or display of firearm in committing felony; penalty. Increases from three to five years for a first offense and from five to 10 years for a second or subsequent offense the mandatory minimum sentences for use or display of a firearm during the commission of certain felonies.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates new mandatory-minimum penalties on people committing certain felonies using firearms. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/07/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200129D
07/07/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4006       Patron: Bill R. DeSteph, Jr.  -  all patrons

Stolen firearms; penalties. Creates or enhances penalties for crimes related to larceny of a firearm or use of a stolen firearm during the commission of a felony. The bill provides that it is (i) a Class 3 felony with a five-year mandatory minimum sentence to commit larceny of a firearm with the intent to sell or distribute and (ii) a Class 5 felony with a two-year mandatory minimum sentence to sell or distribute, attempt to sell or distribute, or possess with the intent to sell or distribute a stolen firearm. The bill adds a one-year mandatory minimum sentence to the crime of receiving a stolen firearm, which is a Class 6 felony. Finally, the bill increases the mandatory minimum sentences for possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony, if such firearm was stolen, from three years to five years for a first offense and from five years to 10 years for a second or subsequent offense.



VCDL Comments
This bill creates new mandatory-minimum penalties on people committing certain crimes using a gun they know, or should have known, was stolen. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/07/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200128D
07/07/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4005       Patron: Bill R. DeSteph, Jr.  -  all patrons

Concealment of firearm in committing felony; penalty. Provides that a person is guilty of a separate felony if he carries about his person any pistol, shotgun, rifle, or other firearm that is hidden from common observation while committing or attempting to commit certain other felonies. A first offense is punishable by a mandatory minimum term of confinement of three years and a second or subsequent offense is punishable by a mandatory minimum term of confinement of five years.



VCDL Comments
This bill sets a new mandatory minimum sentence for a person who possesses a concealed firearm while committing or attempting to commit certain violent felonies. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/07/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200126D
07/07/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4004       Patron: Bill R. DeSteph, Jr.  -  all patrons

Brandishing a firearm; law-enforcement officer; penalty. Provides for a six-month mandatory minimum sentence upon conviction of a person for pointing, holding, or brandishing a firearm or air-operated or gas-operated weapon or object similar in appearance at someone who the person knows or has reason to know is a law-enforcement officer in such manner as to reasonably induce fear in the mind of another.



VCDL Comments
This bill sets a new mandatory minimum sentence for a person who brandishes a weapon at a person he knows or has reason to know is a law-enforcement officer. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/07/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200123D
07/07/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)
SB4003       Patron: Bill R. DeSteph, Jr.  -  all patrons

Violation of protective order; armed with firearm or other deadly weapon; mandatory minimum sentence; penalty. Provides for a three-year mandatory minimum sentence to be served consecutively with any other sentence upon a conviction for violation of a protective order while knowingly armed with a firearm or other deadly weapon. Current law does not specify a mandatory minimum sentence.



VCDL Comments
This bill sets a new mandatory minimum sentence for a person who violates a protective order while knowingly armed. VCDL generally does not like mandatory minimums and believes judges should do their job and decide sentencing in a fair and reasonable manner.
07/07/19  Senate: Prefiled and ordered printed; offered 07/09/19 19200122D
07/07/19  Senate: Referred to Committee for Courts of Justice
07/09/19  Senate: Passed by indefinitely in Courts of Justice with letter (9-Y 6-N)